Arbitration Guide

The Online Arbitration Guide aims at providing international companies, entrepreneurs and in-house lawyers with useful information and guidance in implementing arbitration mechanisms.

The goal of this publication is to walk the readers through the particularities of the arbitration proceedings, such as drafting the arbitration agreement, constitution of the arbitral tribunal and enforcement of the arbitral award.

Also, the authors will provide a practical overview of the provisions of the Code of Austrian Civil Procedure dealing with the arbitration proceedings.

Table of Contents

I. GENERAL   

1.1. Advantages of International Arbitration   
1.2. Institutional Arbitration vs ad hoc Arbitration   
1.2.1. Benefits of Institutional Arbitration   
1.2.2. Ad hoc Arbitration   
1.3. Other Forms of Dispute Resolution   

II. THE ARBITRATION AGREEMENT

2.1 Subjective Arbitrability   
2.2 Objective Arbitrability   
2.3 Form Requirements   
2.4 Minimum content of the arbitration agreement   
2.5 Special Requirements for Consumers   

III. THE ARBITRATION TRIBUNAL

3.1 Constitution of the Arbitral Tribunal   
3.1.1 Number of Arbitrators   
3.1.2 Method for Selection   
3.1.3 Default Procedure under Austrian Law   
3.1.4 Personal Qualifications to Act as an Arbitrator   
3.1.5 Independence and Impartiality of Arbitrators   
3.2 Challenge of an Arbitrator   
3.2.1 Grounds for Challenge   
3.2.2 Challenge Procedure   
3.3 Replacement of an Arbitrator   
3.4 Relationship between the Parties and the Arbitrator   
3.5 Jurisdiction   
3.5.1 Competence-Competence   
3.5.2 Timely Objection against Jurisdiction   

IV. THE LAW APPLICABLE TO THE SUBSTANCE OF THE DISPUTE

4.1 Party Autonomy   
4.2 Arbitrator’s Discretion  

V. THE ARBITRAL PROCEDURE

5.1 Party Autonomy  
5.1.1 Guiding Principle for the Arbitration  
5.1.2 Limits   
5.2 Control of the Proceedings  
5.3 Commencement of the Proceedings  
5.3.1 Request for Arbitration   
5.3.2 Reply and Potential Counterclaim   
5.3.3 Advance on Costs  
5.3.4 Constitution of the Arbitral Tribunal  
5.4 Evidentiary Matters 
5.4.1 Content  
5.4.2 Basic Structure  
5.4.3 Specific Features  
5.5 Structure of a Typical International Arbitration   
5.6 Judicial Assistance from State Courts   

VI. REMEDIES AND COSTS

6.1 Monetary Compensation   
6.2 Interest   
6.3 Costs

VII. SETTING ASIDE AN AWARD

7.1 Structure of Section 611 ACCP  
7.2 Specific Grounds  
7.3 The Austrian Supreme Court as Competent Authority  

VIII. PRIVACY / CONFIDENTIALITY

8.1 Privacy of Arbitration  
8.2 Confidentiality
8.2.1 Express Confidentiality Agreement
8.2.2 Implied Obligation of Confidentiality

IX. RECOGNITION AND ENFORCEMENT

9.1 The New York Convention
9.2 Article V of the New York Convention

X. INVESTOR STATE ARBITRATION / PROPOSAL EU AND ICSID

10.1 Foreign Investment – a Major Component of Today´s Economy   
10.2 The ICSID Convention   
10.2.1 Historical Background   
10.2.2 Legal Framework for Cases Brought before the ICSID   
10.2.3 Overview of the Prerequisites for Cases to Be Resolved by ICSID   
10.3 The Prerequisites in Particular   
10.3.1 Consent to Arbitration   
10.3.2 Contracting State and National of another Contracting State
10.3.3 Legal Disputes Arising out of an Investment
10.3.4 Specifics of ICSID Arbitrations 
10.4 Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs)
10.4.1 Definition  
10.4.2 General Content  
10.4.3 Various Dispute Resolution Procedures
10.4.4 Austria as Party to BITs  
10.5 Implications of the Lisbon Treaty on BITs Concluded by EU Member States